News from the city: apartment rentals, home expo, ash trees, cigarette butts

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Barry’s Construction has won city approval to begin construction of a five-story, $17 million rental apartment building at 530 28th St. W.

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The Owen Sound Planning Department issued a building permit for the 79-unit building, which will feature 12 accessible units with barrier-free washrooms and door operators. There will be one, two and three bedroom units.

Completion is expected in the summer of 2023, according to a city press release touting the addition of additional rental units.

“With these 79 units coming up and many more in the planning stages, the growth is on a positive trend. Good growth is planned and strategic, and we are committed to attracting the housing and industry the community needs,” Mayor Ian Boddy said in the statement.

Council passed a by-law confirming a service agreement for the project Monday evening.

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The annual Home & Cottage Expo will no longer be on display this year due primarily to uncertainty over collection restrictions.

The decision not to continue was made before the holiday by event partners the Knights of Columbus and the Gray Bruce Homebuilders and Trades Association, says a report received by the city’s community services committee Feb. 16. The report was included on Monday’s board agenda.

Another reason was that the trades association anticipated that many of its members attending the show would be “working at full capacity and staff availability would be limited”.

Additionally, many in the construction and trades industry “have expressed anecdotally that they currently do not need to advertise their business or services due to the current high demand.”

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The event, which runs in partnership with the city and takes place at the Harry Lumley Bayshore Community Center, did not take place in 2020 or 2021 due to public health gathering restrictions due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

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Electrical upgrades at Nawash Park are halted after a single $893,000 bid went over budget by $600,000.

But $25,000 will be spent to bring two electrical event pedestals up to electrical code standard and $270,000 in tax-funded capital funds are being invested in the parks reserve.

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The city inoculated 145 ash trees, selected based on their location, size and health, against the emerald ash borer. the trees are in their second cycle of treatment.

Forty diseased ash trees were felled. Following the municipal practice of alternating cutting and inoculation, another 134 trees must be felled.

The city’s emerald ash borer management plan is due for review this year.

The city provides an online Report a Tree Issue form for the public to report concerns about individual trees. See forms.owensound.ca/Report-a-Tree-Concern.

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A pilot project to collect and recycle discarded <a class=cigarette butts in downtown Owen Sound, Ontario. will resume this summer. Photo taken March 1, 2022. (Scott Dunn/The Sun Times/Postmedia Network)” class=”embedded-image__image lazyload” data-src=”https://smartcdn.gprod.postmedia.digital/nexus/wp-content/uploads/2022/03/Cigarette-butt-recycling-receptacle-scaled.jpg?quality=90&strip=all&w=288″ data-srcset=”https://smartcdn.gprod.postmedia.digital/nexus/wp-content/uploads/2022/03/Cigarette-butt-recycling-receptacle-scaled.jpg?quality=90&strip=all&w=288, https://smartcdn.gprod.postmedia.digital/nexus/wp-content/uploads/2022/03/Cigarette-butt-recycling-receptacle-scaled.jpg?quality=90&strip=all&w=576 2x” height=”1244″ loading=”lazy” width=”2560″/>
A pilot project to collect and recycle discarded cigarette butts in downtown Owen Sound, Ontario. will resume this summer. Photo taken March 1, 2022. (Scott Dunn/The Sun Times/Postmedia Network)

A pilot project to collect and recycle discarded cigarette butts, to prevent them from littering the heart of the city, will resume this summer.

Most of the 25 containers have remained in the core since the project’s pre-pandemic launch in 2019. City staff have emptied them sporadically since the pilot project ended in March 2020, due to health and safety concerns regarding the collecting cigarette butts during the COVID-19 pandemic.

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The revived project will involve fewer containers to facilitate collection, at least until the project is evaluated after six months, Rick Chappell, the city’s environmental services supervisor, said in a telephone interview Tuesday.

Owen Sound Waste Watchers volunteers will again pick up cigarette butts from the thin rectangular containers, then store and ship them for recycling. If the project is deemed a success, Public Works staff will assume these responsibilities.

TerraCycle, an American company with a facility in Fergus, offers free recycling programs funded by brands, manufacturers and retailers to help divert hard-to-recycle waste from landfills.

Ashes and tobacco are composted and all plastic, including cigarette butt filters, is melted down to create plastic pellets used for new plastic items, according to the report.

It cost nearly $3,000 to purchase all 25 bins and the city spent about $2,000 to install them. The City’s salary costs since the start of the program are estimated at $7,761.

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